HMC HealthWorks provides Coronavirus resources reminding you to prepare and not panic.

Turning Resolutions Into Lasting Changes

Goals written on a notebook with man hand pen

TURNING RESOLUTIONS INTO LASTING CHANGES

We all make resolutions, but how can we keep them and make lasting changes? Research shows that change is possible and there are
proven strategies you can use to set yourself up for success.
  • Know your habits: The first step to changing your behavior is to be aware of what you do regularly.
  • Make a plan: Small, reasonable goals and specific actions can help you create new habits.
  • Stay on track: Keeping a record can help you track your progress.
  • Think about the future: Focusing on how a change might heal your body and enhance your life can help.
  • Be patient: You’re never too out of shape, too overweight, or too old to make healthy changes. Try different strategies until you find what works best for you.
Change is a process. What’s most important is to keep moving forward.
For more info and strategy info:
https://newsinhealth.nih.gov/2018/03/creating-healthy-
habits#utm_source=govdelivery&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=jan6

MEDIA CONTACT

Staci Rossi

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

What Are Nutrient-Dense Foods?

Assortment of healthy food dishes. Top view. Free space for your text.

WHAT ARE NUTRIENT-DENSE FOODS?

We hear and read a lot about how nutrient-dense foods are essential to be healthy but what does nutrient dense really mean? The basic concept of nutrient density is the amount of nutrients you get for the calories consumed.


So what are they? Nutrient-dense foods are rich in vitamins, minerals and other nutrients important for health, without too much saturated fat, added sugars and sodium. So basically we are talking fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish, lean meat, skinless poultry, peas and beans, and nuts and seeds.


So how can I add them to my diet?
  • Switch from white rice to brown rice.
  • Replace sugary drinks with water, unsweetened tea, or
  • coffee.
  • Instead of a big dollop of sour cream on your chili or baked potato, try plain nonfat Greek yogurt.
  • Switch from processed deli meat to sliced roasted chicken for a hearty sandwich.
  • Snack on crunchy vegetables or nuts instead of chips.
  • Satisfy a sweet tooth with naturally sweet fruit instead of candy and cookies.

Source:

MEDIA CONTACT

Staci Rossi

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Quit Tobacco Successfully

Breake down cigarette.Quitting from addiction concept.

QUIT TOBACCO SUCCESSFULLY

Quitting tobacco is a big decision. For some, going cold turkey works well and others use aids like the patch or gum for a smoother transition to being nicotine free. However, for most quitting tobacco is easier with help. Health coaches are great resource for anyone considering quitting.

 

Most smoking cessation programs report quit rates that rarely exceed 30% at 6 months. A study published by Global Advances in Health and Medicine where Certified Health Coaches utilized the readiness to change model reports smoke free rates at 6 months of 76.9% and 12 months of 63.2%.

 

Health coaches are behavior change specialists. They provide ongoing support, accountability and are experienced with helping people make new lasting habits. Coaches never force their clients into setting quit dates. Rather, the coach guides the client to choose a date that works for them when they are
mentally and emotionally ready.

 

Coaches use the readiness to change model. It is a valuable tool that helps people move toward making changes at their own pace. Below are the stages and examples of the thought progression of tobacco users as they move through the stages. People can migrate through the stages throughout their journey.
Precontemplation stage: the person thinks using tobacco is not a problem
Contemplation stage: the person thinks tobacco may be a problem
Preparation stage: the person wants to quit tobacco
Action stage: the person quits tobacco
Maintenance stage: the person remains tobacco free

 

If you or someone you love uses tobacco and are interested in coaching support, HMC HealthWorks has Certified Health Coaches who can help! Click here to read more. There are also national resources available here:
  1. https://www.hmchealthworks.com/programs/wellness/
  2. https://smokefree.gov/

MEDIA CONTACT

Staci Rossi

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403