HMC HealthWorks provides Coronavirus resources reminding you to prepare and not panic.

Better You

Concept image of a Calendar with a yellow push pin. Closeup shot of a thumbtack attached. The words Change Habits written on a white notebook to remind you an important appointment.
We first make our habits, and then our habits make us. -John Dryden
Many Americans see the start of a new year as a time to evaluate their lives over the previous year. Evaluation can sometimes lead us to set lofty resolutions that rarely make it into February. Here are a few ways to make your resolutions into habits. And remember, any time you try to better your body, mind or spirit, it’s a good thing.
Be Realistic
Instead of trying to lose 50 pounds quickly, set small realistic milestones. Goals don’t always have to be about cutting out your favorite foods or spending countless hours at the gym. Focus on adding a positive new habit to your life. Creating positive and reachable goals builds confidence and increases the likelihood that you will stick with your new habit over time.
Give Back
Try increasing your quality time with family and friends or give back to your local community. These goals will fill your heart and hopefully last longer than vowing off chocolate or chips.
Work Together
Making changes can be easier with a friend or health professional in your corner. Friends and family can be great for accountability and for celebrating your success. If you prefer privacy with your goals, seek out online support groups, apps and you may have health coaches provided through your health insurance.

MEDIA CONTACT

Staci Rossi

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

Thousands of women die from cervical cancer each year, but the disease is virtually always preventable with vaccination and appropriate screening (HPV vaccination & PAP tests).

Among women who had been vaccinated, the percentage of precancers caused by HPV dropped from 55.2% to 33.3%

Although women suffer from cervical cancer from HPV, men are also at risk for other cancers from HPV.

FACTS

Nearly 85% of adults (MEN and WOMEN) between the ages of 18 and 65 will have HPV at some point in their life. About 50% of Americans have it at any given moment.

HPV causes cervical, anal, oral, and other cancers in MEN and WOMEN.

HPV causes genital warts in MEN and WOMEN.

HPV is more prevalent in MEN than WOMEN in the U.S., although men often don’t have symptoms.

The HPV Vaccine is for MEN and WOMEN.

Prevent HPV cancers by getting vaccinated! Prevent genital warts by getting vaccinated!

Did you finish the vaccine series?

2 shots if before age 15.

3 shots if beginning at age 15-26.


For more information on HPV and about getting vaccinated after age 26 go to: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/hpv/hcp/recommendations.html

MEDIA CONTACT

Staci Rossi

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Being Apart During the Holidays

Father and his kids having online video call on Christmas time. Chatting with distant family during pandemic. Staying safe during winter holidays. Christmas celebration using modern gadgets.

BEING APART DURING THE HOLIDAYS

Spend Time with Those in Your Household
  • Hard choices to be apart this year may mean that you can spend many more years with your loved ones.
  • Do what is best for your health and the health of your loved ones. This year spend time with those in your own household. If you live alone, reach out to loved ones and friends online, on the phone or video chat. Be together apart. Social distancing doesn’t mean emotional distancing.
Take Care of Yourself
  • Being away from family and friends during the holidays can be hard.
  • When you talk with your friends and family about plans-it’s okay if you decide to stay home and remain apart from others. It’s okay if others decide they want to remain apart from you and other people.
Do What’s Best for Your Household
  • Doing what’s best for you includes eating healthy foods and getting enough sleep.
  • Take care of your body and stay active to lessen fatigue, anxiety, and sadness.

MEDIA CONTACT

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Mental Health and the Holidays

Stay home quarantine from Covid-19. Christmas gingerbread men with a masks

MENTAL HEALTH AND THE HOLIDAYS

The holiday season is just around the corner and while many look forward to festivities with friends and family, others can experience an increase in stress, anxiety and depression. With COVID-19 on the rise, planning ahead and being aware of your emotions can help you be prepared with a coping skill when
you experience a holiday trigger.
Begin or continue therapy
Although the holidays are typically a busy time, be sure to keep your scheduled therapy sessions or begin therapy if you are having trouble managing your stress, anxiety or depression. The holidays can bring up difficult feelings and having a scheduled therapy session gives you the time to explore and work through them.
Practice self-care
Make time for yourself. Find something that reduces your stress and helps clear your mind. Try taking a walk, listening to music or podcast, reading a book, talking to a good friend or watching a favorite movie.
Set realistic expectations
The holidays don’t have to be perfect. Traditions evolve and change as families grow. Be sure to stick to your budget and manage your time and travel schedule so you can relax and be present with your loved ones.
Limit alcohol use
Alcohol use is known to increase during this time. Instead of trying to relax with alcohol, make a cup of your favorite warm tea and try to practice mindfulness or other healthy activities.
Get some sun
Spending time outdoors in the sun can be an effective centering and calming tool. Even people who are not diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder with a Seasonal Pattern can benefit from spending time in nature and planning ahead to be outdoors on sunny days.
Ask for help
If you feel alone or depressed, reach out for support. Family, friends, religious or community organizations can help.

MEDIA CONTACT

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Getting Ahead: Heart Health for the Holidays

Picture of beautiful family spending Christmas at home

GETTING AHEAD: HEART HEALTH FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Because statistics show the months of December and January are the most stressful of all, and more heart attacks occur during this time, here are a few simple ways to ease into the holidays.
Breathe. Take deep breaths, in through your nose, and out through your mouth. Square breathing also works—it refocuses your mind. Breathe in for 4 seconds, hold for 4 seconds, release for 4 seconds, and remain calm for 4 seconds. Over a small span of time, any anxiety you may feel is reduced. No one can have a panic attack while they perform deep breathing exercises, as the brain and body slows down.
Walk and Self-Talk. One time a day for 30 minutes, one day at a time, is what cardiologists say is a simple way to get moving, every day. Breaking a small sweat while telling yourself positive and encouraging words, such as, “I can do this,” is an excellent way to begin.
Limit alcohol and caffeine. Known as “holiday heart”, this syndrome occurs when people indulge in too much alcohol, which could trigger a heart rhythm disorder, known as atrial fibrillation. Moderation is key. Doctors say individuals with existing heart disease are more vulnerable, but holiday heart also strikes in perfectly healthy individuals, too.
Make quality sleep a priority.
As sleep experts tell HMC in “Secrets to Help You Improve Sleep,” lack of quality sleep leads to brain fog, poor food choices, possible anxiety and potential accidents. Keep screens out of your bedroom and shut off an hour before bed. It will help create a restful environment that will support the movement you incorporate in your day.
Plan to talk with your healthcare provider.
If you are prone to high blood pressure, knowing your numbers is key. Make a telehealth appointment or in-person visit to your doctor ahead of the holidays. The American Heart Association has an online 6-Question Quiz on improving blood pressure. Complete, print off and take with you to your doctor to discuss.

MEDIA CONTACT

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403