HMC HealthWorks provides Coronavirus resources reminding you to prepare and not panic.

COVID-19 and Smoking Cessation

Young woman breaking down cigarette to pieces. - quit smoking concept

COVID-19 AND SMOKING CESSATION

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), quitting cigarettes and e-cigarettes can help protect you from COVID-19.

Smoking is considered a risk factor for respiratory illness and respiratory failure is a common cause of death for those diagnosed with COVID-19.

In fact, there are benefits that can help the body fight off infection soon after you quit:

  • Once you quit, the small hairs or cilia, in your lungs begin to heal giving you stronger lungs to help you fight COVID-19 if you contract it.
  • Your lungs will no longer have the ongoing inflammation caused by smoking and that predispose you to COVID-19.
  • Saying goodbye to smoking strengthens your heart due to increased blood circulation. Quitting helps to thin your blood and makes it less likely to form clot-causing heart attacks. A stronger heart helps if you contract COVID-19.
  • Need another reason to ditch the e-cigs or cigarettes? Quitting now gives your body time to heal and makes your lungs and body stronger against future waves of COVID-19.

Want to learn more about the benefits of quitting? Visit the CDC's website here.

Now is the time to take the first step towards a stronger, healthier you. Looking for a helping hand? Talk to a HMC HealthWorks Certified Health Coach for tips, tricks and one-on-one support. Call 888.369.5054

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Parents at Home with Children Due to COVID-19

Horizontal banner serene couple and little daughter sitting on sofa in lotus position closed eyes do meditation breathing technique in living room, keep calm, healthy life habits and lifestyle concept

PARENTS AT HOME WITH CHILDREN DUE TO COVID-19

Families are now finding themselves working, playing, going to school and living all under one roof. Due to the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, millions of adults and children are learning to adapt to their new normal. It is important to remember; the first few days or weeks of any new routine can be challenging. Below are three tips for finding balance with everyone under one roof.

  1. CREATE  A RHYTHM FOR THE FAMILY. Try to avoid having a strict schedule because failing to adhere can be disappointing. Instead have a general rhythm that you follow each day. Be sure to include time for exercise, to do house chores, catch up with friends and family remotely and time to be outside. It is important to maintain an eating schedule so you don’t find yourself snacking all day long.

  2. OVER-COMMUNICATE. This applies to your family and work. Everyone is adjusting, so it is critical to have conversations about these changes. If you are working from home, be sure your family knows even though you are home you need space and time to work. Kids will react differently to the changes and will need you to provide guidance. Be sure to speak clearly, openly and with age appropriate language to help them adjust to their new normal.

  3. HAVE FUN! Look for new ways to connect with your children and partner. Play boardgames, go for hikes or spend time in nature. Cook a new meal or delicious dessert. Start a puzzle or make a fort with blankets. Listen to audiobooks, dig into your family history or have a dance party.

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Kidney Donors Save Lives

Adult and child holding kidney shaped paper on textured blue background, world kidney day, National Organ Donor Day, charity donation concept

KIDNEY DONORS SAVE LIVES

Benefits of Living Donation

Nearly 100,000 people are on the waiting list for a kidney transplant. There are many benefits to becoming a living donor. One of the most obvious benefits is that you can save a life, or drastically improve the quality of life for the recipient. Long-term survival is markedly improved among patients who receive a donor kidney compared with patients who remain on dialysis. When a recipient has a living donor, the wait time for transplant is shorter and the transplant can be scheduled. This allows for donations to take place when the recipient is in good health and when it is convenient for both the donor and the recipient, such as summer vacation or winter break.
Live organs that are transplanted last longer than cadaveric organs, and live organs begin to
function more quickly than cadaveric donations. This helps ease the process for the recipient
and frees up a cadaveric kidney for another recipient.
Many more people are waiting for a kidney than for all other organs combined. Unfortunately,
the number of people waiting for kidneys is much larger than the number of available kidneys
from living and deceased donors. Click on the link below for more info on kidney donation.

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Heart Smart

Close-up Of Male Hand With Smartwatch And Cellphone Showing Heartbeat Rate Sitting At The Table

FROM THE BLOG

HEART SMART

Siri, do I have AFib? A smartwatch can accurately warn about atrial fibrillation, a type of irregular heartbeat, according to a study reported by the American Heart Association. A study, which involved about 419,000 Apple Watch users, found the device accurately detected the condition in more than a third of participants who received notifications of an irregular pulse.

When someone has an ischemic stroke – the most common type, where a vessel supplying blood to the brain is blocked – fast treatment to inject the clot-busting drug alteplase is considered essential. Generally, it has been thought the drug needed to be used within 4 1/2 hours of the onset of symptoms. But a study in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests some patients might be helped even if they receive the drug up to nine hours after symptoms begin.

Keeping tabs on your health or the health of a loved one with apps that track heart rate, blood pressure, fitness, and endurance can reveal a lot about the efficacy of medications, lifestyle adjustments, and other treatments. Tracking metrics is also a great way to have more productive and accurate conversations with your or your loved one’s healthcare team.


For more info on this topic click on the link below:

https://www.franciscanhealth.org/news-and-events/news/new-atrial-fibrillation-afib-apps-track-irregular-heartbeats

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Drug & Alcohol Facts Week

Midsection of therapist holding patient hands

FROM THE BLOG

DRUG & ALCOHOL FACTS WEEK

January 19th – 25th is Drug & Alcohol Facts Week. Answer the following questions that are part of the National Drug & Alcohol IQ Test. Answers listed at the bottom. For more information click on the links.

  1. True or False: The percentage of underage drinkers (ages 12-20) who drink has increased over the last 10 years.

A. True

B. False

https://www.samhsa.gov/data/report/2017-nsduh-detailed-tables

  1. Yes or No: Cocaine and methamphetamine are both in a class of drugs called stimulants. Does this mean they achieve their effects in the same way?

A. Yes

B. No

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/methamphetamine/how-methamphetamine-different-other-stimulants-such-cocaine

  1. True or False: Electronic vaping devices like e-cigarettes can help keep teens away from real cigarettes.

A. True

B. False

https://teens.drugabuse.gov/drug-facts/tobacco-nicotine-vaping-e-cigarettes

  1. Which of these is a symptom of alcohol overdose?

A. Irregular breathing

B. Confusion

C. Vomiting

D. All of the above

https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/brochures-and-fact-sheets/understanding-dangers-of-alcohol-overdose


ANSWERS:

  1. B
  2. B
  3. B
  4. D

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403