HMC HealthWorks provides Coronavirus resources reminding you to prepare and not panic.

Monitor Your Blood Pressure Regularly

Checking blood pressure with digital monitor, older woman health check

MONITOR YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE REGULARLY

Measure your blood pressure regularly to help your health care team diagnose any health concerns early. You and your health care team can take steps to control your blood pressure if it is too high.

Talk with your health care team about regularly measuring your blood pressure at home, also called self-measured blood pressure (SMBP) monitoring.

SMBP means you regularly use a personal blood pressure measurement device at home, work, or another setting outside of a doctor’s office or hospital. These blood pressure monitors are safe and easy to use. If you need assistance, a health care team member can help.

Evidence shows that people with high blood pressure are more likely to lower their blood pressure if they use SMBP combined with support from their health care team than if they do not use SMBP.

For more info on measuring your blood pressure click here.

Click here to download a blood pressure log.

 

MEDIA CONTACT

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Mental Illness Awareness Week

Mental Health Concept Of Young Man With Jigsaw Shaped Pieces Missing From Mind

MENTAL ILLNESS AWARENESS WEEK

Each year, 1 in 5 U.S. adults experience mental illness, 1 in 25 experience serious mental illness and 17% of youth (6-17 year old) experience a mental health disorder. Millions of Americans face the reality of living with a mental health condition. However, mental illness affects everyone directly or indirectly through family, friends or coworkers. Despite mental illnesses’ reach and prevalence, stigma and misunderstanding are unfortunately, widespread.

Some are lucky enough to find stability and peace with their disorder, potentially including therapy and a medication regimen that works for them. Others never find solace, and many are unfortunately lost to suicide. There is always hope, especially when communities understand what the world is like when you have mental illness.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

What People with Mental Illness Want You to Know - https://nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/October-2020/What-People-with-Mental-Illness-Want-You-to-Know

Mental Health Care Matters - https://www.nami.org/NAMI/media/NAMI-Media/Infographics/NAMI-Mental-Health-Care-Matters-FINAL.pdf

The Ripple Effect of Mental Illness - https://www.nami.org/NAMI/media/NAMI-Media/Infographics/NAMI-Impact-Ripple-Effect-FINAL.pdf

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

September is National Suicide Prevention Month

SEPTEMBER IS NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION MONTH

Often, family and friends are the first to recognize the warning signs of suicide and can be the first step toward helping an at-risk individual find treatment with someone who specializes in diagnosing and treating mental health conditions.

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403

Staying Occupied and Reducing Stress During the Coronavirus Pandemic

SHARING THE JOURNEY

Staying Occupied and Reducing Stress During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Download the PDF version here

In recent months, the spread of the coronavirus has forced us to face very uncertain times, which can lead to many difficult emotions. We asked our colleagues at HMC HealthWorks in Jupiter, Florida, how they have kept themselves and their family occupied and managed anxiety, stress, and other emotions during this time?

Here’s what they had to say about keeping occupied:

 

BE SURE TO LOOK FOR OUR NEXT BLOG ABOUT OUR EMPLOYEES SHARING THIER EMOTIONS, ANXIETIES AND COPING STRATEGIES.

 

Staci DeFazio

SVP, Marketing & Communications

sdefazio@hmcebs.com

860.697.6960 x403